Recipe Friday: Bread with a Side of Cinnamon Rolls

Prep Time: 20 min + overnight
Cook Time: 20 – 35 min

Although this can be made all at once, instead of fermenting, this recipe is best if the dough is allowed to ferment, as described in the instructions, for 8 hours or overnight.

This recipe makes one loaf of bread and 7 – 9 cinnamon rolls (depending on how thick you cut them). After the overnight fermenting, allow three hours from adding the next-morning ingredients to taking them out of the oven.

Yield: 1 loaf and 8 rolls

Ingredients:

            The first day:

  • 4 tablespoons flaxseed
  • 4 tablespoons chia seed
  • 6 cups flour (I used 4 cups einkorn and 2 cups spelt flour)
  • 2 tablespoons egg replacer
  • 1/4 cup kefir, or other fermented liquid
  • 1 3/4 cups milk
  • 10 tablespoons melted butter or olive oil

            The second day:

  • 1 tablespoon (heaping) active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon sucanat or honey
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt

            For the cinnamon rolls:

                        for the filling:

  • 3 tablespoons butter, very soft (if you prefer to omit the cream cheese, use 5 tbs butter)
  • 3 ounces cream cheese, very soft
  • 1/2 cup sweetener, such as palm coconut sugar or sucanat
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon cloves

                        for the caramel-type sauce:

  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/4 cup palm coconut sugar or brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/3 cup milk or cream
  • more cinnamon

Directions:

The first day:
In a coffee grinder, or other similar device, grind the flax and chia seeds until well ground, 10 – 20 seconds.
Add all the first-day ingredients to a large mixing bowl. Mix well enough that all the dry ingredients are incorporated. Cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap, and let it sit 8 hours or overnight at room temperature.

The second day:
Proof the active dry yeast with 1/4 cup warm water and 1 tablespoon sucanat.
Add the salt to the dough, mix in.
Stir in proofed yeast. It is easier (and less messy) to let the mixer do the initial mixing, with a dough hook, even though you may have to babysit it with a spatula for a while.
After the dough comes together, turn out onto a countertop (with all the oils in the dough, it didn’t stick, so I didn’t need to dust with flour).
Knead until smooth and dough doesn’t crack or come apart (10 – 15 minutes).
Return dough to the mixing bowl, cover with a damp towel, and let rise in a warm oven until double (30 – 60 min, depending on your yeast).
Turn dough out and punch down.
Roll dough into a fat log and divide 3/5 by 2/5. The slightly larger “half” will be your loaf of bread.
Shape the larger “half” into a loaf and place into a loaf pan (I use an 8 ½ x 4 ½” pan). Let this start rising as you prepare the cinnamon rolls.

Cinnamon rolls:
Heat the oven to 350°. Put the 1/4 cup of butter into a large cast iron skillet, a large (Pyrex-type) pie plate, or an 8×8″ baking pan. Melt the butter in the oven.
Take the smaller “half” of the dough and roll out to a rectangle, about 1/4″ thick. Eyeball approximate length/width to slice into 7 or 8 rolls.
Mash the softened butter and cream cheese together; spread over the dough rectangle.
Take the melted butter out of the oven, turn off the oven. If you leave the door ajar, you can let your bread and rolls rise in there after it cools a bit.
Mix together the 1/2 cup sweetener, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves; sprinkle over the butter/cream cheese.

Back to the melted butter in the baking pan: Mix the 1/4 cup palm coconut sugar, vanilla, and milk together, and pour into the melted butter. Swirl around and mix it together. Sprinkle as much cinnamon over the top as you like.

Back to the dough: Roll the dough into a log, carefully keeping the sugar and spices inside.
Slice into 7 – 9 rolls, depending on how thick you like them.
Place the rolls into the prepared pan.
Let the rolls rise alongside the bread. They should both be ready to bake in another 20 minutes or so. (Check on them, as dough rises in varying times, depending on your yeast.)
Turn oven to 375°.
Bake the rolls and the bread together.
Rolls should be done in 20 – 30 minutes, depending on how doughy you like them. Tops should be browned nicely.
Remove the rolls from the pan immediately. Cut around each roll, lift from the pan, and invert each roll onto a plate. If any sauce is left in the pan, spoon it over the rolls.
Bread will be done after 30 – 35 minutes total baking time. The loaf should sound hollow when tapped.
Let the loaf cool for 5- 10 minutes. Turn out onto a wire rack to cool another 15 – 20 minutes, then package.

Recipe Friday: Kathy’s Sandwich Bread

This is my new favorite bread recipe. It slices beautifully, is flexible when sliced, and it’s pretty tasty. It’s good for sandwiches or toast – whatever you use bread for. Since I rarely eat bread, I slice the whole loaf, put squares of baking/parchment paper in-between the slices; then put the loaf into a zip lock freezer bag to freeze. I can take out as many slices as I need at a time, and they don’t take long to thaw.

I’ve discussed soaking grains previously. This is a traditional method of preparing grains that our ancestors knew all about. How did we lose such important information??? Grains have a protective enzyme that benefits them while they’re growing, but are non-beneficial to us when we eat them. Effects of these enzymes on us include making the grain hard to digest, inability to absorb all the nutrients available in the grain, and gas and bloating.
Soaking neutralizes the enzymes, thereby opening up all the nutrients for us to absorb, and we digest them more easily.
When you soak grains, use a small amount of some type of acid such as apple cider vinegar, yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir. When I soak rice (or quinoa), I add a splash of vinegar to the water the day before I plan to serve it. Understand, we eat a traditional Midwest “dinner” at noon. Grains should soak 8 hours or overnight; so, if you plan on an evening supper, get your grains soaking that morning. For the rice, I soak overnight, then drain and rinse it before adding the amount of cooking water needed.
Likewise, when I make my biscuits, I mix the flour, oils, and liquid the night before, making sure to add some kefir to the liquid.
For oatmeal (or any other “breakfast grain”) I use yogurt or kefir. It adds a delicious richness.

Remember to use high-quality, organic flours. Processed white flour is not good for you.

I did post my bread recipe previously (it’s in the Biscuit post as a bonus, and if you want even more to read about the health benefits of soaking your grains, you can read it there.). But I changed it up just a bit and am really pleased with the results.

This recipe makes two loaves.

Time: 10 min the night before + overnight soaking + 10 min mixing + 2 hours combined rising time + 30 – 35 min baking

Ingredients:

The first day:

  • 4 tablespoons flaxseed
  • 4 tablespoons chia seed
  • 6 cups flour * (I used 4 cups einkorn and 2 cups spelt flour)
  • 2 tablespoons egg replacer (this can be omitted, but it helps with texture)
  • 1/4 cup kefir, or other fermented liquid
  • 1 3/4 cups dairy or non-dairy milk *
  • 10 tablespoons melted butter or olive oil*

The second day:

  • 1 tablespoon (heaping) active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon sucanat or honey*
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Directions:

The first day:
In a coffee grinder, or other similar device, grind the flax and chia seeds until well ground, 10 – 20 seconds.
Add all the first-day ingredients to a large mixing bowl. Mix well enough that all the dry ingredients are incorporated. Cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap, and let it sit 8 hours or overnight at room temperature.


The second day:
proof the active dry yeast with 1/4 cup warm water and 1 tablespoon sucanat.
Add the salt to the dough, mix in.
Stir in proofed yeast. It is easier (and less messy) to let the mixer do the initial mixing, with a dough hook, even though you may have to babysit it with a spatula for a while.
After the dough comes together, turn out onto a countertop (with all the oils in the dough, it didn’t stick, so I didn’t need to dust with flour).
Knead until smooth and dough doesn’t crack or come apart (10 – 15 minutes).
Return dough to the mixing bowl, cover with a damp towel, and let rise in a warm oven until double (about 1 hour, depending on your yeast).
Turn dough out and punch down. Cover with a damp towel and let rest 10 minutes.
Shape into 2 loaves and place into loaf pans.
Let rise in a warm oven until almost double (about 1 hour).
Bake in a 375° oven 30-35 minutes. Loaves should sound hollow when thumped (internal temp of 200°).
Turn out to let cool 15 – 20 minutes, then package.


* Pretty much any combination of your allowable flours / oils / sweeteners / milk will work with this recipe.

 

Recipe Friday: Kathy’s Biscuits and Bread

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This is the recipe that I prepare most often. I make a double batch at a time so that in the mornings, I can have a smoothie and a biscuit with peanut butter and honey. Yum, and it’s just enough to tide me over until our main meal around noonish.

Before I talk about preparation, a note about flour: I HIGHLY recommend that you do not use the store-bought bleached white flour. It is wheat flour that has been poisoned by weed killer, soaked in glyphosate until it dies (wheat must die before harvesting), and processed-out of nutrients. The chemicals used for growing and processing remain in the flour, and then you eat them. Yech. Please search for organic whole-grain flours. Einkorn is an ancient wheat, still unspoiled by modern methods. Any flour you use should be organic (organic must be non-gmo and not use chemicals – but research the company that sells it).

I like to soak my flours before I bake them. I’ve done considerable reading about grains and the benefits of soaking, fermenting, and sprouting. (Note: if you can buy organic, pre-sprouted flours, that is the most convenient route.)

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One of the sites I found with lots of information was https://pamelasalzman.com/soak-grains/ . You can read even more interesting info if you scroll down past the article and read the comments and replies.

“Whole grains can definitely be part of a healthful diet, but they are much more nutritious and digestible when prepared the way our ancestors did by soaking, fermenting or sprouting them before cooking or eating.

“Whole grains contain an anti-nutrient called phytic acid which binds with certain minerals (e.g.  zinc, phosphorous, calcium and iron) and  prevents them from being absorbed by the body.  Phytic acid is also very hard on the digestive system.  Most of the phytic acid is contained in the exterior bran and germ layers of the grain.  Ironically, whole grains are much higher in minerals than polished or refined grains, but we won’t receive those benefits unless we neutralize the phytic acid.”

And from this site: https://be-still-farms.com/blogs/healthy-organic-living-blog/29811009-why-soak-grains-before-cooking

“Pre-soaking grains also helps break down certain hard-to-digest proteins such as gluten. In addition, certain complex starches and fiber also become easier to digest as they are broken down further by the soaking process. As a result, individuals may notice that many of their gluten sensitivities or allergic reactions may be lessened when grains are soaked prior to cooking.

“Typically grains are soaked in warm water. Based on the type of grain, soaking periods can vary from a couple of hours to soaking overnight. For instance, grains like buckwheat, millet and brown rice do not have very high amounts of phytate, so they can be soaked for a few hours. Other grains, such as whole wheat, spelt, or oats, should be soaked overnight due to their high phytate content.”

Soaking is beneficial for seeds, grains, and nuts. The difference between seeds and grains? This is what I found, and I’m still chewing it over, trying to figure the difference:

http://www.differencebetween.net/science/difference-between-seeds-and-grains/  “A seed is an ovule containing an embryo while a grain is a fusion of the seed coat and the fruit.”

https://onsetworldwide.com/grains-versus-seeds/  “By definition, a seed is a ‘flowering plant’s unit of reproduction, capable of developing into another such plant’. Grains (cereals) grow from the seeds of grasses. Nuts grow from the seeds of trees. And seeds (pseudocereals or other ‘seeds’) grow from the seeds of non-grasses.

“For example:

      • “Wheat, corn, oats and rice are all seeds, further classified as Grains
      • “Amaranth, quinoa, and buckwheat are all seeds, further classified as Pseudocereals
      • “Chia, sunflower, sesame, pumpkin are all seeds, classified as Seeds.”

Here are two recipes. I created the biscuit recipe first, then the bread recipe sprang from it. They are quite moist and flexible (many whole-grain bread recipes are not) due to high oil content and the addition of flax and chia seeds.

Kathy’s Biscuits

Yield: 8-9 biscuits (Note: this recipe doubles easily, and the finished biscuits freeze well.)

Prep Time: 20 min + overnight
Cook Time: 15 min

Although these biscuits can be made all at once, instead of soaking, this recipe is best if the dough is allowed to soak, as described in the instructions, for 8 hours or overnight.

Ingredients:

The first day:

  • 2 tablespoons flaxseed
  • 2 tablespoons chia seed
  • 2 cups flour (whatever kind, gluten-free or non-gluten-free; I usually use two flours, such as spelt and barley, or oat and einkorn)
  • 3 teaspoons egg replacer (I use Ener-G brand, gluten-free)
  • 1-2 tablespoon kefir, (use an acidic liquid, such as apple cider vinegar, yogurt, lemon juice, or kefir)
  • 2/3 cup any type of dairy or non-dairy milk
  • 5 tablespoons melted butter or coconut oil (I usually use a combination of butter and olive oil to equal 5 tablespoons)

The second day:

  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon sweetener (sucanat, honey, etc.)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:

The first day:

  1. In a coffee grinder, or other similar device, grind the flax and chia seeds until well ground, 10 – 20 seconds.
  2. Add all the first-day ingredients to a large mixing bowl. Mix well enough that all the dry ingredients are incorporated.
  3. Cover with a towel or plastic wrap, and let it sit 8 hours or overnight at room temperature.

The second day:

  1. Preheat oven to 430°.
  2. When the dough has soaked, uncover it and add the baking powder, sweetener, and salt. Mix well.
  3. Dump out dough and knead/handle into a ball. (I haven’t needed to sprinkle flour on the board or my hands, as this dough has lots of oil. But, do so if you need to.
  4. Knead a few times to bring it all together. For a more tender biscuit, knead as little as possible. (I use my biscuits as a sandwich bread alternative, so I knead it a bit more, like bread dough.) If it seems too dry, sprinkle with a few drips of milk or water; if it seems too wet, add some flour; and work in gently.
  5. Roll or pat out to ½ – 3/4  inch thick and cut with a 2.5 inch biscuit cutter/drinking glass top. Gently transfer biscuits to an ungreased cookie sheet.
  6. Bake 13 – 15 min until golden brown on top.

Kathy’s Biscuit Bread

Yield: 2 loaves

Prep Time: 20 min + overnight
Cook Time: 15 min

This makes a lovely bread that keeps together well, and is flexible when sliced. It’s good for sandwiches or toast – whatever you use bread for.

Ingredients:

The first day:

  • 4 tablespoons flaxseed
  • 4 tablespoons chia seed
  • 5 cups flour (I used 3 cups einkorn and 2 cups barley flour)
  • 2 tablespoons egg replacer (I use Ener-G brand, gluten-free)
  • 1/4 cup kefir, or other fermented liquid
  • 1 1/2 cups any type of dairy or non-dairy milk
  • 10 tablespoons melted butter or olive oil or combination

The second day:

  • 1 tablespoon (scant) active dry yeast (exact measurement is 2-2/3 tsp)
  • 1 tablespoon sweetener (such as sucanat, coconut palm sugar, honey, or maple syrup)
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:

The first day:

  1. In a coffee grinder, or other similar device, grind the flax and chia seeds until well ground, 10 – 20 seconds.
  2. Add all the first-day ingredients to a large mixing bowl. Mix well enough that all the dry ingredients are incorporated.
  3. Cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap, and let it sit 8 hours or overnight at room temperature.

The second day:

  1. Proof 1 tablespoon active dry yeast with 1/4 cup warm water and 1 tablespoon sweetener.
  2. Add the salt to the dough, mix in.
  3. Stir in proofed yeast. It is easier (and less messy) to let the mixer do the initial mixing, with a dough hook, even though you may have to babysit it with a spatula for a while.
  4. After the dough comes together, turn out onto a countertop (with all the oils in the dough, it didn’t stick, so I didn’t need to dust with flour).
  5. Knead until smooth and dough doesn’t crack or come apart (10 – 15 minutes).
  6. Return dough to an oiled mixing bowl, turn dough so it is covered with a sheen of oil, cover with a damp towel, and let rise in a warm oven until double (about 1 hour, depending on your yeast).
  7. Turn dough out and punch down. Cover with a damp towel and let rest 10 minutes.
  8. Shape into 2 loaves and place into oiled loaf pans.
  9. Let rise in a warm oven until almost double (about 1 hour).
  10. Bake in a 375° oven 30-35 minutes. Loaves should sound hollow when thumped (internal temp of 200°).
  11. Turn out to let cool 15 – 20 minutes, then package.

BiscuitBread