Free Herbal Webinar Opportunity

I have personally learned so much from Rosalee and John, and continue to subscribe to their newsletter. In their latest offering, they outline herbs and how they interact with the viruses that run amuck during the cold and flu season. Here is information from their registration page at https://explore.learningherbs.com/secrets-of-antiviral-herbs/  :

LearningHerbs presents a FREE webinar

The Secrets of Antiviral Herbs

7 Powerful Remedies, 6 Misunderstood Herbs & The 5 Stages of Winter Wellness

Presented by Rosalee de la Forêt and hosted by John Gallagher of LearningHerbs

  • Understanding viruses and how antiviral herbs really work
  • How to know if an herb is actually antiviral or not (Also, which information to trust)
  • The 5 Stages of Winter Wellness (This is the key to knowing which herb to use and when to use it)
  • Herbs for upper respiratory infections
  • Is it still safe to use elderberry?
  • Going beyond antiviral herbs to eliminate the Cycle of Sickness (So you and your family can get healthy and stay healthy)

During the webinar, we’ll give you this Key to Winter Wellness chart, along with recipe cards for 7 of Rosalee’s favorite cold & flu season remedies.

Recipe Friday: My Other Morning Drink

This hot drink is comforting and filling, besides being pretty healthy. It can be enjoyed any time of day. It is a mixture of Dandy Blend, turmeric bone broth, collagen, sucanat, and rice milk.

Dandy Blend is an easy-to-dissolve blend of roasted barley, rye, chicory root, dandelion root, and sugar beet. It is touted as a good coffee substitute, with no headache upon withdrawal. It has no caffeine, acidity, or bitterness. I enjoy the taste as-is, and it can be prepared hot or cold. It’s sold in most health food stores, and online (I buy it through vitacost.com). I first bought the smallest size available, but I liked it so much, I now buy it in the blammo-size packages.

Ancient Nutrition Bone Broth Protein – Turmeric delivers 20 grams of protein per serving. (Bone broth is one of the healthiest nutrients you can consume. See my other posts, https://maggietiggles.wordpress.com/2021/10/08/recipe-friday-how-i-make-bone-broth/  and https://maggietiggles.wordpress.com/2019/09/27/recipe-friday-bone-broth-and-butternut-squash-soup/ for more information.) I bought it for the turmeric content: turmeric is a fabulous natural anti-inflammatory. I don’t know what made me think of adding it to my Dandy Blend, but I’m glad I did. The taste is really good. Ancient Nutrition also sells other flavors: pure, chocolate, vanilla, pumpkin spice, and salted caramel. I haven’t tried any of the other flavors in my morning mix. The turmeric blend does not contain any sweetener; most of the other blends have stevia or other natural sweetener (except the pure). If you use a sweetened blend, you will likely not need to add any sweetener to your drink.

Ancient Nutrition Multi Collagen Protein delivers 20 grams of protein per 2 scoops, besides the 5 types of food source collagen. (Collagen promotes healthy hair, skin, joints and digestion.). It is mostly tasteless, but adds some richness and body. You can also get other flavors of collagen. I get both Ancient Nutrition products from store.draxe.com.

My sweetener of choice is sucanat, but use any kind you like, or none at all.

It works best if you mix the powdered ingredients together really well before adding the hot water. The protein powders tend to clump badly; but they don’t if you mix well first. I top it off with a splash of rice milk.

To make one 16 oz. cup:

1 spoon of Dandy Blend

1 scant scoop of Bone Broth Protein – Turmeric

1 scant scoop of Multi Collagen Protein

½ spoon sucanat

Directions:

Measure ingredients into a 16 oz mug. Stir the ingredients together well.

Add boiling water, stir to dissolve.

Add some cream, milk, or non-dairy alternative to taste.

Because I drink this often, I make up a larger quantity at a time. Ingredient amounts can be adjusted to taste.

Quart mixture:

5 heaping spoons of Dandy Blend

5 heaping scoops of Bone Broth Protein – Turmeric

5 heaping scoops of Multi Collagen Protein

5 heaping spoons of sucanat

Add all ingredients to a 1-quart mason jar. Mix contents thoroughly.

To make a 16-oz mug:

Add two heaping spoonfuls of the mixture to the mug.

Add boiling water.

Stir to dissolve.

Add milk, cream, or non-dairy alternative to taste.

Recipe Friday: Pumpkin Stew

Pumpkin stew! This is a yummy and different way to present a dinner.


To make: Prepare your favorite recipe for stew. (We put ours in a slow cooker for 8-10 hours overnight.) Cut the top off a pumpkin and scoop out the seeds and pulp.

Set oven to 300 degrees. Be sure to lower the rack and take out the upper rack, because you’ll need the vertical space.

Prepare a baking pan by pouring 1-2 cups of water into it.

(I sprayed inside and outside the pumpkin with cooking oil, but I don’t know that I needed to.)

Spoon the stew into the pumpkin.

Place the pumpkin into the prepared pan. Bake the pumpkin for an hour; after an hour, put the top on the pumpkin, and bake one more hour.

When you serve it, scrape the inside of the pumpkin as you scoop out the stew, to make sure some of the pumpkin meat gets into the bowl.

Serve with crusty bread and a salad.

Recipe Friday: How I Make Bone Broth

Bone broth is my morning hot drink. It is one of the most nutritious things you can ingest because of its healing, protective, and regenerative capabilities.

For more information about the healing properties of bone broth, go to draxe.com and do a search for bone broth. One of the articles is here: https://draxe.com/nutrition/bone-broth-benefits/ .

Before I get into how to make bone broth, I should divulge that you can take easier routes. Sometimes I buy bone broth. You can do your own search for your favorite type/s. I buy bone broth from Walmart as a backup. It says it’s bone broth (not chicken broth or beef broth, i.e.), and it’s organic, so I believe them. I stipulate, however, that I fortify that bone broth with collagen and gelatin (the same as I do my own bone broth, and how I do that is at the end of this post).

Another easier route is to buy powdered bone broth. Dr. Axe’s store sells several types of flavored and unflavored powdered bone broths (some may also be purchased through vitacost.com, one of my favorite sites to shop). My favorite is the turmeric bone broth. Be aware that his powders (Ancient Nutrition brand) take a lot of mixing to get all the clumps out, and it’s best to use very hot water (or whatever liquid you’re using), unless you are using a good blender. These powders can be used many ways (again, visit Dr. Axe’s site for ideas), such as baked goods, oatmeal, and drinks. My favorite is to mix Dandy Blend, turmeric bone broth, and a bit of sucanat with hot water, then add a splash of rice milk.

To make your own bone broth, you can use a large saucepan, a slow cooker, or a pressure cooker. I use an Instant Pot.

If you use the slow cooker or the saucepan, you will need to simmer the bone broth for 2 or 3 days (36 hours is prime), adding water as needed to keep the pot full.

In an Instant Pot or other pressure cooker, 5 hours will do it. When I use my Instant Pot, I plan on the whole day to make bone broth: from prep, to cooking, to pressure release, to draining and cooling, to cooling in the jars, to clean up and refrigeration. I bought a strainer insert for my Instant Pot, and it saves the time and hassle of straining hot broth from the bones and veggies at the end.

Ingredients:

  • Bones (can use chicken, beef, pork, or fish, or any combination) In my Instant Pot, the bones of one small chicken is just enough for one batch. Or, three or four T-bones. If you’re using raw soup bones, it’s a good idea (for the sake of flavor) to roast the bones first. If you have stuff like chicken’s feet and necks, those are good.
  • Veggies: when I chop onions, celery, and carrots for recipes, I keep the ends in a freezer bag. I use some or all of these ends. You can just chop up any vegetables you like, too. Garlic is a good addition.
  • Organic apple cider vinegar (this helps draw the nutrients from the bones; the vinegar taste does not come through to the finished bone broth, unless you add too much)
  • Natural sea salt or Himalayan salt (PLEASE, do not use grocery store, white table salt. It is pure sodium chloride and is bad for you. Natural mineral salts, on the other hand, contain minerals that are salty, and they’re not all sodium: there are magnesium salts, for example, among others. Even if you’re buying labeled “natural” salts, read the label to see what’s in it, and make sure it’s not a bunch of chemicals.)
  • Filtered water

Directions:

If you have one, put a strainer in the Instant Pot insert. Dump your bones and veggies into the strainer. (Yep, they’re still frozen, and that’s okay. Break them apart if you need to, to fit in correctly.)

Add 1 – 2 tablespoons of good salt

Pour 2 tablespoons of organic vinegar into a pitcher of water. (I just do this to get the vinegar mixed in well. You can add the vinegar and water separately, if you like.) Add it to the pot.

Add more water as needed to the fill line.

Put the cover on the pot and make sure it’s properly locked. Turn the vent to Seal.

Use the Soup function, if you have it. The highest number for time is 4 hours. I cook mine for 5 hours, but I set it at 4 for now.

The pot will start heating and cooking. Once it comes to pressure, the timer will start the countdown.

Somewhere in the middle of the countdown, but after at least one hour is up, I add an extra hour.

After the cooking time is up, let the pressure release naturally. Wait for the pressure pin to drop. This will take 30 – 60 minutes.

After the pressure has released and the pin has dropped, carefully take off the lid.

Use pot holders to take the full insert out of the pot.

Use the handle to lift the strainer full of bones and veggies out of the broth. Put a cooling rack on top of the insert, and rest the strainer on top of the cooling rack. Let the strainer drain and cool.

When the broth has strained out of the bones and veggies, remove the strainer. You can compost the bones and veggies, or throw them away.

Make sure the broth is cool enough before you pour it into jars.

Wait until they’ve cooled enough; then screw lids on (I use plastic lids, but the metal bands and lids are fine) and refrigerate.

To prepare bone broth as a hot drink:

I heat enough bone broth each morning for two people. Yes, you can just heat and drink, but I like to stretch mine with amendments. When heating, please use a stove and not a microwave; microwaves destroy some of the vital nutrients.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup bone broth
  • 2 tablespoons powdered gelatin
  • 2 scoops collagen powder
  • 1 ½ cups filtered water
  • Natural salt, to taste

Directions:

Pour about 1 cup of bone broth into a small saucepan.

Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of powdered gelatin over the top.

Sprinkle 2 scoops of collagen over the top.

Add some healthy salt. Start with a few shakes. You will need to taste your bone broth before you pour it into your cup, to see how much salt you’ll need to add when you prepare this batch of bone broth.

Turn the burner to high. After a minute or two, start whisking the mixture. Don’t wait too long, as the gelatin will sink to the bottom and stick.

Heat and whisk until all the lumps are out. The mixture will be fairly hot by this time.

Add 1 ½ cups of filtered water. Stir and heat until hot enough for you to drink.

Use a spoon to take a taste, and add salt if needed. Stir well.

Pour into two mugs. Your bone broth is ready to enjoy.

You needn’t worry about consuming too much salt, if it’s the healthy kind, and used in moderation. I used to drink salt sole (pronounced “so-lay”) every morning, but now I get my salt via bone broth. Salt sole is simply a saturated mixture of salt (REAL salt, not table, store-bought salt) and water (FILTERED water). Why is it so healthy? Because Himalayan salt or Celtic salt is naturally occurring, and provides a multitude of essential minerals our bodies need to function properly. And, the minerals are delivered in a way that our bodies can assimilate and use. Please see my post on Salt Sole here: https://maggietiggles.wordpress.com/2019/12/27/recipe-friday-salt-sole/

Herbal Workshop Opportunity

I learned a LOT from Chris Dalziel, and wanted to share her recent opportunity with you.

The website to register: https://ultimatebundles.com/uhlb2021-webinar-registration/

From her e-mail:

Cold and flu season is coming up fast. Are you prepared?

If you’re looking for reliable natural remedies, I can help!

I’ve partnered with Ultimate Bundles to teach a free class called:

5 Essential Herbal Remedies for Cold and Flu Season

In this free workshop, you’ll learn:

  • How to be prepared for flu and cold season
  • What easy-to-find ingredients you can use to make remedies for your family
  • How to make herbal remedies even when you “don’t have time”
  • How to take herbal remedies effectively when you feel under-the-weather
  • Why you can feel comfortable with the treatment you’re using on yourself and your family
  • And more!


Save your seat right here!

I’m super excited about this class, and even more excited about you learning these skills to help your family, especially this winter.

If you are wondering why I love to teach this class?

In this class you’ll not only get recipes to make 5 essential cold and flu remedies that have helped my family weather the current “big nasty”.  But you’ll also learn 9 herbal medicine making skills that you can use over and over. 

I believe strongly in giving you a quick-win to build your momentum in learning these essential self-reliant skills.  And this class will help you do just that.

The class is on Monday, October 4th at 3pm EST (12 Noon Pacific time).  Its a live class where you can get your questions answered in real time.

Click here to register!

Recipe Friday: Cran-Apple Crumble

It is cranberry and apple season! The cool blustery winds are coming in, the leaves are turning, and fall is in the air.

Cran-Apple Crumble is a seasonal dessert just right for potlucks, or for nibbling in the house. Have it with some coffee any time.

The flours and sweeteners mentioned are the healthy version; however, you can use white sugar, white flour, and brown sugar in this recipe.

As with many recipes, the amounts listed are suggestions: you can go crazy with cranberries, apples, oats, and sweeteners as you like. Customize this as you will; I like to add a bunch of cinnamon and nutmeg. 🤤

Ingredients:

3 cups                  peeled and chopped tart apples

2 cups                  fresh or frozen cranberries

¾ cup                   sucanat, coconut palm sugar, honey, or maple syrup

3 tablespoons     whole grain oat, barley, or wheat flour

                              Topping:

1 1/2 cups           quick-cooking oats

1/2 cup                 whole grain oat, barley, or wheat flour

1/2 cup                 coconut palm sugar

1/2 cup                 butter, melted

Directions:

In a medium-large bowl, combine apples, cranberries, sweetener, and flour. Pour into a greased 11×7-in. baking dish.

In a bowl, mix topping ingredients until crumbly; sprinkle over apple mixture. Bake at 350° for 50-55 minutes or until fruit is tender.

Recipe Friday: Choco-Cherry Shake

In trying to think of something different for breakfast, I came up with this. My normal breakfast is a smoothie and a biscuit with peanut butter and honey. Like, every. single. morning. I love the nutrition I get from my breakfast, and the way it fills me up just right. But I suddenly got bored.

I had some raw milk that I wanted to use up before it went bad; some yogurt sounded like a good idea; I should add some protein powder; I should have some fruit; and, as an afterthought, I threw in some of my super-greens powder (that taste didn’t come through).

I didn’t want to wash my blender bowl, either. So, I used my immersion blender. It worked well except for the parsley flakes I added to the super-greens powder – I had to chew on those just a bit.

I enjoyed the taste of this; and it could be for any time.

I don’t list amounts for any of the ingredients because I rarely measure, and everything depends on how many people will be consuming it. I have a scoop that came with my bone broth protein powder, and I added one scoop of that. The bone broth protein powder that I use, it should be mentioned, is sweetened, but it’s with monkfruit, which is a healthy, no-calorie sweetener (like stevia). So, if your protein powder is not sweetened, you may need to add something to make it palatable (it’s hard for me to eat plain yogurt 😝). Suggestions: raw honey, real maple syrup, date syrup.

If you drink this right away, the frozen fruit makes it thick and icy, like a milkshake. But I couldn’t finish the whole thing, and stored it in the ‘fridge until later; and it was still very good.

I used dark sweet cherries and chocolate protein powder, but I think other combinations would also be delicious, like vanilla bone broth powder with frozen peaches or berries.

Ingredients:

  • Raw milk
  • Organic, plain, whole-milk yogurt
  • Chocolate protein powder
  • Super greens powder
  • Frozen dark sweet cherries

Directions:

Add all ingredients to a deep cup or blender. Use an immersion blender or high-speed blender, and blend on high until all is dissolved and mixed completely. Enjoy.

Recipe Friday: Peace and Joy Essential Oil Diffuser Blend

Pretty much every day, and certainly every evening, I put essential oils in my diffuser. My daytime diffuser sits in our kitchen, which is an open space to the dining area. I spend a lot of time around there, so I like to enhance my moods and physical health with the benefits of essential oils

The essential oils, and their benefits, in my daytime favorite, which I name Peace and Joy are as follows. Benefits and other information are listed for use in diffusing (inhaling), topical application, and ingestion.

  • Lemon: cleaning, lymph drainage, cleanses the body, antibacterial, antitumoral, antiseptic, improves microcirculation, immune stimulant (increases white blood cells), improves memory; use for circulatory problems, arteriosclerosis, obesity, parasites, urinary tract infections, varicose veins, anxiety, hypertension, digestive problems; acne; use with local honey to treat/sooth a sore throat; drink in water to promote weight loss; detox for gallbladder and lymphatic system (drink in water)
    • Other info:
      • topical, inhale, diffuse, ingest
      • citrus family
      • Caution: avoid applying to skin that will be exposed to sunlight within 24 hours
      • Made from the peel
  • Sweet orange: eases stress and anxiety (when used as aromatherapy); Improves digestion and helps to relieve constipation; Nourishes dry, irritated and acne-prone skin when mixed with a carrier oil and applied as a cream; Promotes a feeling of happiness and warmth when used in aromatherapy; Helps to eliminate toxins from the body; Helps in stimulating lymphatic action to promote balance in water processes and detoxification of the body; antimicrobial properties; may prevent the proliferation of E. coli bacteria; Natural remedy for high blood pressure; anti-inflammatory; Reduces anxiety and boosts mood; Natural anti-depressant; mild tranquilizer
    • Comes from Citrus sinensis, the oranges you are used to eating. It is derived from the fruit, especially the rind.
  • Grapefruit: supports metabolism, cellulite reduction, antitumoral, metabolic stimulant, antiseptic, detoxifying, diuretic, fat-dissolving, cleansing for kidneys, lymphatic and vascular system, antidepressant. Rich in limonene, which has been studied for its ability to combat tumor growth. Used for Alzheimer’s, fluid retention, depression, obesity, liver disorders, anxiety
    • Other info:
      • Mix with coconut oil and rub on areas of cellulite, or take a few drops internally with water
      • topical, inhale, diffuse, ingest
      • citrus family
      • Caution: avoid applying to skin that will be exposed to sunlight w/in 24 hours
  • Frankincense: reduces inflammation, destroys cancer, spiritual awareness; boosts immune system, treats autoimmune disorders, fights infections, improves anxiety ,heals skin (acne, scars), balances hormone levels, regulates estrogen production, eases digestion (helps produce bowel movements), beneficial in reducing symptoms of leaky gut syndrome, sleep aid, antiviral; contains sesquiterpenes which stimulate the limbic system of the brain (the center of memory and emotions) and the hypothalamus, pineal and pituitary glands. (The hypothalamus is the master gland of the body, producing many vital hormones including thyroid and growth hormone.)
    • Other info:
      • Breathe it for immune, colon, lungs
      • Apply to neck and feet to boost immune system
      • sometimes referred to as olibanum
      • topically, inhale, diffuse, or ingest
      • This is a potent oil: if you ingest, dilute it first, and do not ingest large quantities.
      • Mix 6 drops to one ounce of carrier oil and apply to the skin to fight
      • sagging, wrinkling (helps tighten skin)
      • Helps speed digestion, like digestive enzymes (modulates the gut)
      • Add a few drops to a cloth and inhale for respiratory assistance (good for asthma or allergies); or an oil diffuser.
      • Inhaling also helps relieve muscle aches, stress, and negative emotions.
  • Rosemary: thickens hair, improves brain function and memory; good for Alzheimer’s, soothes aches and pains, balances androgen and estrogen, liver detox and gall bladder function (benefits bile flow, reduces plasma liver enzymes), lowers cortisol (lowers stress), protects the liver, anti-tumoral, antifungal, antibacterial, antiparasitic, enhances mental clarity & concentration, relieves throat & lung infections
    • Other info:
      • an evergreen oil
      • from labiatae family
      • part of the “four thieves” formula
      • add a drop to shampoo for healthy hair
      • dilute to apply topically, directly inhale, diffuse, ingest
      • Cautions: do not use on children under 4 years of age; avoid using on persons with high blood pressure
  • Peppermint: digestion, aids in absorption, cools heat in the digestive lining; focus, energy booster, fever reducer, relieves headaches and body/muscle aches. Anti-inflammatory, antitumoral, antiparasitic (worms), antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, gallbladder/digestive stimulant, pain-relieving, curbs appetite, helps with irritable bowel system; improves focus, improves breathing (bronchitis, pneumonia, allergies); relieves headaches (2 drops peppermint + 2 drops lavender, rub on forehead)
    • Other info:
      • Can rub right on the stomach to relieve symptoms; also rub on bug bites for a few days to relieve itch
      • topical, inhale, diffuse, ingest
      • inhale 5-10 x/day to curb appetite
      • do not apply to infants younger than 18 mo
  • Eucalyptus: good for respiratory issues like bronchitis, sinusitis and allergies; insect repellent (helps block malaria), expectorant, mucolytic, antimicrobial, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-aging; respiratory/sinus infections, decongestant, rheumatism/arthritis
    • Other info:
      • can use the leaves to cover wounds, to disinfect
      • a spray of 2% eucalyptus oil will kill 70% of airborne staph bacteria
      • topical, inhale, diffuse, ingest
      • myrtle family

Just think of all the health benefits we get from essential oils!

To make Peace and Joy Blend:

Ingredients:

  • 3 drops lemon essential oil
  • 4 drops sweet orange essential oil
  • 5 drops grapefruit essential oil
  • 3 drops Frankincense essential oil
  • 3 drops rosemary essential oil
  • 2 drops peppermint essential oil OR eucalyptus essential oil

Directions:

Fill diffuser to manufacturer’s instructions with tap water (mine holds 2 oz, or ¼ cup).

Drop essential oils into the water. (Amounts are really up to you.)

Replace diffuser lid.

Turn diffuser on.

Recipe Friday: Leftover Turkey or Chicken Shepherd’s Pie

Serves: 5

Yield: 1.5 qt baking dish
Prep Time: 30 min
Cook Time: 30 min

I pulled our leftover Christmas turkey from the freezer this week. It was more than enough for one meal. I served it with mashed potatoes and gravy (chicken bone broth, thickened with some cornstarch), and we had more leftovers. I didn’t want anything (again) that smacked of Christmas or Thanksgiving, so I browsed the Internet for ideas, and came up with this alteration.
I made this with leftover turkey, but any kind of cooked meat would do: chicken, canned chicken, beef, venison, buffalo, pork, etc.
The measurements for all the ingredients are just suggestions; but this amount fit easily into a 1.5-quart baking dish.
If you want to stretch this, you can add corn, peas, and/or green beans to the top of the pie before you put on the mashed potatoes.
As for the mashed potatoes: we like potatoes in this house, so 3 cups was just right. If you like potatoes even more than we do, pile ’em on!
I used a sour cream and chives mixture to add to the mashed potatoes. Any kind of cheese would be a nice substitute (I’m thinking cream cheese…yum).
As we ate it, I thought that perhaps mushrooms would be a good addition in the sauté. Also, I have another Shepherd’s Pie recipe for beef, and it includes a dash of ground clove. I had my doubts about that, but after tasting it, I now add a bit of clove to many of my beef dishes.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons     butter

1                            medium onion, peeled and chopped

3                            stalks celery, with leaves, chopped

2                            medium carrots, sliced

1 teaspoon          minced garlic

2 1/2 cups           leftover meat, such as turkey, chicken, or pork; cut to bite-size pieces

                              salt, to taste

                              black pepper, to taste

1/4 teaspoon       dried tarragon

1/2 teaspoon       dried basil

2 cups                  gravy, more or less to appearance, texture, and taste

3 cups                  mashed potatoes, more or less to taste

1/4 cup                 sour cream

                              corn, green beans, peas; optional

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350°.

In a large skillet over medium heat, melt butter. Add onion, celery and carrots, cooking until onions are translucent.


Gently heat mashed potatoes until stir-able, and stir in the sour cream.
Add turkey, seasonings, and garlic, cook 2 minutes.
Add gravy, cooking until heated through. Transfer to a 1.5-quart baking dish.


Spread mashed potatoes over the top of the meat mixture
If your meat mixture is pretty runny, leave the dish uncovered as it bakes. If it’s dry, cover it.
Bake for 30 minutes.

Recipe Friday: Beef Stew in the Instant Pot

This recipe takes a bit longer than the dump-set-and-forget-it types, as it takes some babysitting. I cook the meat, then add the potatoes and carrots and cook again. Total time is about 2 1/2 hours. A quicker way to cook it is to add all the ingredients and then bring to pressure for 18 minutes. I did that the first time, from a recipe I found; but the potatoes and carrots were too soft and mushy for me.
Any kind of red meat would go nicely in this stew.
A nice alternative to the cornstarch slurry is to add instant mashed potato flakes, a little at a time, until the desired thickness.

This is good with a crunchy, chewy bread, or biscuits.

Servings: 4 – 6
Prep Time: 30 min
Cook Time: 2.5 hours, includes coming to pressure and natural pressure release

Ingredients:

2 pounds beef stew meat (or venison or whatever kind)

2 medium-large onions, diced

2 generous stalks celery, diced, include leaves

a few shakes each of spices: paprika, celery seed, basil, cayenne, minced garlic, parsley

1 cup strong, hot coffee; mix 1 tablespoon salt into it to dissolve

1 cup water

4 or 5 medium potatoes, cut into bite-size pieces

7 medium-large carrots, cut into bite-size pieces

4 tablespoons cornstarch mixed with a small amount of water or broth to make a slurry

Directions: Use Sauté mode to brown meat and onion. When mostly cooked, stir in celery. Cook maybe 10 minutes more, then add spices and stir well. Cook another 5 minutes.
Add a small amount of the coffee/salt, and scrape to stir up the fond.
Pour the rest of the coffee, and the extra cup of water, into the pot. Stir.
Put on the lid, set to Seal. Set Meat/Stew mode to 10 minutes.
Since it was hot from the sautéing, the pot took about 10 minutes to come to pressure.
Natural pressure release for 10 minutes, then release pressure.
Press Cancel.
Remove lid carefully.
Add the potatoes and carrots, stir.
Replace the lid and seal.
Set Meat/Stew mode to 8 minutes.
When the 10 minutes is finished, allow 10 minutes for natural pressure release, then release pressure and remove the lid.
Press Cancel, then press Sauté.
Stir in cornstarch slurry and stir thoroughly. Allow to simmer and thicken.
Serve.