Recipe Friday: Kathy’s Sandwich Bread

This is my new favorite bread recipe. It slices beautifully, is flexible when sliced, and it’s pretty tasty. It’s good for sandwiches or toast – whatever you use bread for. Since I rarely eat bread, I slice the whole loaf, put squares of baking/parchment paper in-between the slices; then put the loaf into a zip lock freezer bag to freeze. I can take out as many slices as I need at a time, and they don’t take long to thaw.

I’ve discussed soaking grains previously. This is a traditional method of preparing grains that our ancestors knew all about. How did we lose such important information??? Grains have a protective enzyme that benefits them while they’re growing, but are non-beneficial to us when we eat them. Effects of these enzymes on us include making the grain hard to digest, inability to absorb all the nutrients available in the grain, and gas and bloating.
Soaking neutralizes the enzymes, thereby opening up all the nutrients for us to absorb, and we digest them more easily.
When you soak grains, use a small amount of some type of acid such as apple cider vinegar, yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir. When I soak rice (or quinoa), I add a splash of vinegar to the water the day before I plan to serve it. Understand, we eat a traditional Midwest “dinner” at noon. Grains should soak 8 hours or overnight; so, if you plan on an evening supper, get your grains soaking that morning. For the rice, I soak overnight, then drain and rinse it before adding the amount of cooking water needed.
Likewise, when I make my biscuits, I mix the flour, oils, and liquid the night before, making sure to add some kefir to the liquid.
For oatmeal (or any other “breakfast grain”) I use yogurt or kefir. It adds a delicious richness.

Remember to use high-quality, organic flours. Processed white flour is not good for you.

I did post my bread recipe previously (it’s in the Biscuit post as a bonus, and if you want even more to read about the health benefits of soaking your grains, you can read it there.). But I changed it up just a bit and am really pleased with the results.

This recipe makes two loaves.

Time: 10 min the night before + overnight soaking + 10 min mixing + 2 hours combined rising time + 30 – 35 min baking

Ingredients:

The first day:

  • 4 tablespoons flaxseed
  • 4 tablespoons chia seed
  • 6 cups flour * (I used 4 cups einkorn and 2 cups spelt flour)
  • 2 tablespoons egg replacer (this can be omitted, but it helps with texture)
  • 1/4 cup kefir, or other fermented liquid
  • 1 3/4 cups dairy or non-dairy milk *
  • 10 tablespoons melted butter or olive oil*

The second day:

  • 1 tablespoon (heaping) active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon sucanat or honey*
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Directions:

The first day:
In a coffee grinder, or other similar device, grind the flax and chia seeds until well ground, 10 – 20 seconds.
Add all the first-day ingredients to a large mixing bowl. Mix well enough that all the dry ingredients are incorporated. Cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap, and let it sit 8 hours or overnight at room temperature.


The second day:
proof the active dry yeast with 1/4 cup warm water and 1 tablespoon sucanat.
Add the salt to the dough, mix in.
Stir in proofed yeast. It is easier (and less messy) to let the mixer do the initial mixing, with a dough hook, even though you may have to babysit it with a spatula for a while.
After the dough comes together, turn out onto a countertop (with all the oils in the dough, it didn’t stick, so I didn’t need to dust with flour).
Knead until smooth and dough doesn’t crack or come apart (10 – 15 minutes).
Return dough to the mixing bowl, cover with a damp towel, and let rise in a warm oven until double (about 1 hour, depending on your yeast).
Turn dough out and punch down. Cover with a damp towel and let rest 10 minutes.
Shape into 2 loaves and place into loaf pans.
Let rise in a warm oven until almost double (about 1 hour).
Bake in a 375° oven 30-35 minutes. Loaves should sound hollow when thumped (internal temp of 200°).
Turn out to let cool 15 – 20 minutes, then package.


* Pretty much any combination of your allowable flours / oils / sweeteners / milk will work with this recipe.

 

12 thoughts on “Recipe Friday: Kathy’s Sandwich Bread

  1. Thanks for sharing the bread idea here. The pictures too! Who doesn’t love the smell of bread in the kitchen! We used to own a breadmaker but then struggled to find the mixes that worked in it. So we got rid of it. Oh well. gonna go make some toast right now! Hugs.

    Liked by 1 person

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