Recipe Friday: Sauerkraut

RecipeFridaySauerkraut

Sauerkraut? Really? Youbetcha. I am all about healing the gut, absorbing the most nutrition possible from the healthy foods we eat, easing digestion, and empowering our immune systems.

Fermented foods fill the bill.

Why not just buy it? Store-bought sauerkraut  is heated at high enough temperatures to kill all the bacteria.  Problem is,  it kills the good bacteria along with the bad bacteria. If you make your own, proper fermenting provides the good bacteria.

There are a lot of different fermented foods recipes. You can try many of them out at Wardee Harmon’s site, https://traditionalcookingschool.com/food-preparation/recipes/44-fermented-probiotic-filled-condiments/ . Wardee is one of my favorite healthy-food-and-lifestyle go-to’s because she tries out whatever she puts out there. She’s done a lot of research and a lot of homework, and she cooks for her family. In another post, https://traditionalcookingschool.com/pod-cast/kyf-156-7-fermenting-mistakes-you-might-be-making/ , she reassures the timid that yes, you really can eat fermented foods. And yes, you really can make them.

Why fermented foods? Fermenting allows healthy bacteria to grow in our food. We eat the healthy bacteria, and that bacteria works in our gut to assist in digestion. That helps us to better absorb nutrients in the food. And it helps whisk the bad bacteria out. Eating fermented foods boosts our immune systems. Fermentation used to be much more common than it is now; folks knew they needed to eat fermented foods along with their meals: yogurt, fermented vegetables, fermented drinks. Food companies have figured out how to make something taste fermented without actually fermenting it, or processing it so that it no longer offers the benefits (store-bought sauerkraut, pickles, pickled beets, etc.). Now it’s a thing we have to talk about because somehow it went out of style; it’s important to bring it back.

Dr. Josh Axe does a nice job of explaining health benefits of fermented food in this article, and lists some common fermented foods: https://draxe.com/nutrition/fermented-foods/ .

You can find numerous youtube videos showcasing homemade sauerkraut. I invite you to do a search and choose a favorite to watch. You’ll see how simple it really is. This is a good one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EO90h3xB3oc

And then, much to my surprise, homemade sauerkraut tastes delicious! I’m not much of a sour-tasting kind of gal (I run strongly along sweet-tooth lines). But I enjoy my homemade sauerkraut. Another nice thing about it is, you don’t have to eat very much of it to enjoy the benefits. A few spoonfuls will do the trick. And if you’re suffering from digestive issues, you can drink some sips of just the juice to help alleviate symptoms.

Sauerkraut

Ingredients:

  • Cabbage (red or green; wilted/brown outer leaves removed)
  • Salt (sea salt or Himalayan or mineral salt)
  • Optional ingredients:
    • Onion (red, yellow or white)
    • Carrots
    • Garlic
    • Apple (washed and cored)

Directions:

  1. Notice there are no amounts of each ingredient. That’s on purpose because you can make as much or as little as you want. If you’re using cabbage for another purpose, you can save just a bit aside and try a small batch.
  2. Shred all ingredients into a bowl larger than your pile of ingredients.
  3. Sprinkle with salt. Taste your mixture; you add salt until the mixture tastes pretty salty, but not too much. For one medium cabbage, you can start with a tablespoon of salt.
  4. Use a meat pounder or large spoon and pound the mixture. Alternatively, you can do this with your hands: do a hard massage. You want to bruise the ingredients. You’re looking for the salt to draw out the juices. Pound for five or ten minutes.
  5. Cover the bowl with a dish towel or cheesecloth for 30 minutes.
  6. Pound or massage some more; get those juices flowing.
  7. Transfer the mixture to a CLEAN glass jar.
  8. Push the mixture down so that the liquid covers it. If there is not enough juice to cover the mixture, add filtered water; you need just enough to submerge it. (If you need a lot of water, add some more salt.)
  9. Cover the jar with cloth. (I see most recipes online say to use something to weight-down the mixture inside the jar, and then to cover the jar with a lid. If you use a lid, make sure to open it once or twice per day, to let the expanding gasses out, so the jar doesn’t explode.)
  10. Let the mixture sit on your counter for 3 – 7 days. Each day, take a look at it. There should be bubbles forming. Stick a knife or chopstick down into it to stir it a bit and get the bubbles out. Make sure the solid ingredients stay submerged.
  11. After 3 days, do a smell test. It should smell sour, but not disgusting. Look at it carefully. There should be no mold (if there is mold, throw it away and start again).
  12. Taste it. If you like the way it tastes, put it in the refrigerator and start eating it. If you like, you can keep it on the counter to continue fermenting. Taste it once in a while to see what you like. (Again, if you see mold, or if it smells off, throw it away.) Once or twice each day, stick the knife or chopstick in and massage the bubbles out. There should always be enough liquid to cover the solid mixture. Add filtered water if you need to.
  13. I usually put mine in the ‘fridge after 4 days; but that’s the way I like it.

Your homemade sauerkraut should last in the ‘fridge for about 6 months.

What to do with your sauerkraut?

  • Eat it plain
  • Put a little on a sloppy joe / steamburger / tavern or pulled pork sandwich
  • Top a hot dog or brat
  • Side dish for pork chops, with a little applesauce
  • Drink sips of the liquid to ease digestion or calm a queasy stomach; this can also be a quick boost to your immune system, and is helpful if you feel like you’re coming down with something.
  • Add to a smoothie (a couple of tablespoons adds probiotics, but won’t add much taste)
  • Salad ingredient
  • Add to a tuna sandwich
  • Mix in with potato salad
  • If you cook your sauerkraut, it will kill the beneficial microorganisms. You can enjoy the taste of it cooked. If you like, add some extra, uncooked, to the same dish, to add some probiotics.
    • Reuben sandwich or gourmet grilled cheese
    • Baked sausage & kraut

Humble

Humble

What does it mean to humble one’s heart, to have a humble heart? The book of Deuteronomy is a good place to begin to learn about how God wants to humble our hearts.

Deuteronomy 6.5 Hear, O Israel: And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might.

Deuteronomy 6.11b – 13 … when thou shalt have eaten and be full; Then beware lest thou forget the LORD, which brought thee forth out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage. Thou shalt fear the LORD thy God, and serve him, and shalt swear by his name. 

God tells us to beware, when we have it good: We’ll start thinking we did all this ourselves, start patting ourselves on the back. We’ll forget our Lord God, forget His goodness and mercy and generosity. He did not design us to function that way. He designed us so that our greatest joys, our most complete fulfillment, our most abundant life, happens when we humble our hearts before Him.

God knows it is good for us to be humble, so He humbles us through allowing trials and tribulations. Deuteronomy 8.3 And he humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna, which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know; that he might make thee know that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the LORD doth man live. (By the way, this is the verse that Jesus quoted to Satan when He was tempted in the desert. Jesus humbled Himself and came to us.)

1 Peter 5.6 Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you (lift you up) in due time.

Lift us up from what / to what?

Lifting up from our pit / morass of slime and sin.

If you don’t know that you are in this slimy pit, then you need to meet Jesus Christ (1Jn 1.8 If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.)

Lifting us to Him, setting our minds on things above, not of this earth.

Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus ©1922 by H. H. Lemmel

Turn your eyes upon Jesus
Look full, in his wonderful face
And the things of earth will grow strangely dim
In the light of his glory and grace

Pride is thinking we have control over anything; Humble hearts acknowledge that God owns everything, and we are His grateful servants.

Humble: “giving” all to God, knowing He owns it all; being reduced to simply a heart for God, a heart that HE gave me (Ezekiel 11.19 And I will give them one heart, and I will put a new spirit within you; and I will take the stony heart out of their flesh, and will give them an heart of flesh. Ezekiel 36.26 A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh.)

 

Regenerate Webinar

I’ve been listening, for the past two days, to Sayer Ji in his Regenerate Yourself Masterclass. He shares some intriguing and relevant information regarding our health. Sayer Ji is always research- and fact-based.

Today (Tuesday, Feb 25, 2020) is Day 2 of the class, and it runs until March 1. These things often have a binge-watch replay weekend; I don’t know if that will be the case with this one. Day 1 was fascinating, as was today’s.

Day 1 video was just over 15 minutes; Day 2 was around 30 minutes.

Here is the link. https://regeneratemasterclass.com/expert/module-2/

Recipe Friday: Tea

RecipeFridayTea

Oh, how comforting is a cup of tea! Tea is one of my favorite things to do each day. I was introduced to hot tea by an English woman when I was in high school. She served it to me with 4 lumps of sugar and some cream. So delicious as all those sugars and carbs zipped straight to the pleasure centers of my brain! I was hooked on it as warm, comforting, and satisfying. I have since learned to curb my sweet tooth propensity and look more toward healthy options. I was doing well to make herbal teas with a bit of natural organic honey added until my friend was visiting and I noticed she didn’t put any honey in hers. “Oh,” I thought, “I guess tea doesn’t HAVE TO have sweetener in it at all!” This was a revelation to me. Well, we’re all still learning.

Of course, “a cuppa tea” in casual conversation may refer to a number of hot drinks: infusions, decoctions, herbal teas, green/black/oolong tea, etc. To get that out of the way, I first offer a glossary:

“Tea” technically refers to Camellia sinensis, the leaves of which may be made into  white tea, yellow tea, green tea, oolong, dark tea, and black tea, depending on how the leaves are processed.

“Herbal tea,” or tisane, refers to using the roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or flowers of plants to make a hot drink (stems don’t generally have much medicinal value).

Preparation of plant parts may be divided into

  • Infusion: herbs macerated and steeped in water
    • Quick infusion = 5 minutes in hot water: good for small amounts of herbs. These herbs do well in a quick infusion:
      • Chamomile
      • Sage
      • Peppermint
      • Thyme
      • Tulsi
      • Rosemary
      • Lemon verbena
    • Nourishing herbal infusions are steeped for longer periods, good for pulling out nutrients. Pour hot water over the herb, cover, and let sit for 8 hours or overnight. Some herbs good for nourishing herbal infusions:
      • Linden
      • Hawthorn
      • Plantain
      • Violet
      • Stinging nettle (the most famous nourishing herbal infusion)
      • Mullein
      • Oats
      • Red clover
    • Cold infusion: herbs are infused in cold water for 4 to 8 hours, often placed in a sunny window, can also be placed in the refrigerator
  • Decoction: simmering plant parts for a length of time (20 – 60 minutes)
  • Any of these may be gently re-warmed before you drink.

Cautions:

  • Always know your tea source. Choose organic brands. You do not want to drink teas made from chemically-laden plants.
  • Do not use aluminum pots or pans for preparing tea.
  • Avoid plastics.
  • Drink tea in moderation. Too much of anything is not healthy.
  • Some people are allergic to some plants. Avoid teas made from known allergens (although, some people are able to overcome allergies by ingesting small amounts at a time).

I use the term, “tea” to refer to hot drinks I make from plant parts.

I prefer loose tea, as it is easier to buy and store in bulk. I use mason / glass jars of varying sizes. It is best to store herbs in a cool, dark place. Label your herbs with the name(s) and date. I say name(s) because sometimes I mix herbs together in a big jar to avoid having to mix them every time I want to use them. Tea bags, however, are a convenient and clean way to make tea.

While I buy most of my herbs for teas, I grow a few. Each summer I grow peppermint in a pot; at the end of summer, I dry the leaves, crush, and store them. (I also grow stevia in the summer, and dry and grind the leaves to use as a sweetener.) We have four linden trees in our yard. I discovered them shortly after we moved into the house, and I was following my nose to the source of the rich, flowery scent. I was delighted to find that the flowers and leaves of the linden were not just for show, but were also medicinal. When it came time to prune the branches, we hung them in the garden shed until they dried, then I stripped the leaves and flowers, and stored them in a gallon glass jar.

To make tea:

  • Use filtered water. Your water should be as pure as possible.
  • Bring the water to a boil, then let it cool only slightly.
  • Pour the hot water over the herbs into a cup or teapot. (How much herb? Whatever tickles your fancy at the time. Herbal teas are food, and it would be well nigh impossible to overdose. That said: Please drink responsibly.)
  • Cover the cup or teapot to contain the nutritive oils.
  • A hot pad underneath and a tea cozy atop will help keep everything at the right temperature.
  • After steeping, press the herbs to extract all the benefits you can from the plant parts.
  • Some teas lend themselves to mixing with other teas. Nettle, for instance, while extremely nutritious, tastes pretty “green.” Adding a bit of peppermint or lemon in with the nettle improves the experience.
  • Most people like to add a bit of sweetener to their tea. Honey is the favored choice, and it’s a good one (if you use natural, raw, organic honey) because you add more nutrition (and some say it’s a good way to prevent against seasonal allergies). Please don’t ruin your tea with off-the-shelf sugar. Sugar is like an anti-nutrient, and it grabs all your immune system’s attention for the duration of the digestion and processing of it out of your system. There are other, preferable, sweeteners available, like maple syrup, sucanat, and stevia. (See my post, https://maggietiggles.wordpress.com/2019/10/11/recipe-friday-treat-time-chocolate-mug-cake/ , for a discussion of sweeteners.)

Enjoy drinking your tea. Tea is soothing and nourishing: let it be so.

My favorite go-to tea is a mix of peppermint and stinging nettle. Stinging nettle is a fabulous source of magnesium (along with other nutrients), and many health-conscious writers advocate drinking it daily. [Rosalee de la Foret (at https://learningherbs.com/ and https://www.herbalremediesadvice.org/ ) claims that stinging nettle remains an unsung champion for improving health in many powerful ways. She advocates drinking a nettle infusion daily for general health, as it contains an amazing amount of nutrients that can support your energy level as well as the health of your bones, hair, and teeth.] Peppermint is great for the digestive system. We have our main meal at noon, and I usually have my peppermint/nettle tea afterward. Peppermint is best steeped quickly, and nettle is best steeped in a long infusion. I compromise both. I prepare my peppermint tea bag and my scoopful of nettle in a cup with simmering water, cover it with a small saucer, then put my tea cozy over the whole thing. I let it steep for about 20 minutes (sometimes much longer, if I forget about it).

Another tea I use often is a mixture of elderberry, hawthorn berry, mullein, peppermint, calendula, and stinging nettle. This is a good tea for hot/moist colds, but also good for boosting your immune system. Elderberry prevents viruses from replicating; hawthorn provides Vitamin C; peppermint is antimicrobial and antiviral; mullein protects mucous membranes from inflammation, thereby decreasing mucous secretions; calendula is antimicrobial and assists the lymphatic system; elderberry, hawthorn berry, and peppermint are immune-boosting. I either add the herb mixture to simmering water and continue to simmer, covered, for 15-20 minutes; or prepare it as I do the peppermint and nettle.

SO MANY herbs make well into teas (I have most of these at home). I culled the Internet for information, and found most of it at Dr Josh Axe’s site, draxe.com :

  • Green teas are made from leaves that have not been fermented, so they have higher levels of antioxidants.
  • Milk thistle: detoxifying, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, promotes liver and gallbladder health, good for digestion, soothes mucous membranes throughout the body, increases breast milk production
  • Burdock root: cleanses the blood (detoxifier), lymphatic system strengthener, skin healer, natural diuretic
  • Chamomile: antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, promotes tranquility, resolves digestive issues, treats insomnia, relieves mild pain
  • Jasmine green tea: just inhaling the beguiling fragrance is good for my soul. Jasmine improves mood, overcomes stress, and balances hormones.
  • Dandelion leaves: enhances heart health, boosts weight loss, supports liver function (besides making tea, dandelion leaves are a powerhouse of nutrition and are good for consuming, either fresh in a salad, chopped into a pesto, or sautéed with onions)
  • Dandelion root (quite tasty when the root is roasted): promotes good digestion, liver-healthy, benefits cholesterol, good antioxidant, antimicrobial
  • Yarrow: reduces inflammation (especially in the digestive tract), sedative to relieve anxiety or insomnia, stimulates blood flow, helpful for high blood pressure and asthma
  • Turmeric: powerful anti-inflammatory, relieves joint pain, enhances immune function, regulates blood sugar, helps manage cholesterol levels (drinking turmeric tea with pepper, honey, lemon, ghee, or coconut milk can enhance its properties)
  • Barley: cleanses the kidneys, treats kidney stones, flushes out toxins, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antioxidants to safeguard the body against cell damage, stomach pain relief, reduces sleep disturbances, reduces constipation
  • Red clover: benefits for menopause, bone and heart health, balances hormones
  • Moringa: anti-inflammatory; treats thyroid disorders, kidney stones, bacterial, fungal, viral and parasitic infections; high in protein, Vitamin A, potassium, calcium, and Vitamin C; antioxidant; balances hormones; helps improve digestive health; boosts liver function, helps detoxify the body; protects and nourishes the skin; mood stabilizer; protects brain health
  • Licorice root: adaptogenic herb (helps balance, restore and protect the body, helps you respond to any influence or stressor, normalizing your physiological functions), leaky gut remedy, anti-inflammatory, enhances the effects of other herbs to be more beneficial, helps with heartburn and acid reflux, helps with adrenal fatigue, boosts immunity, effective expectorant and soothing demulcent (helps with colds)
  • Matcha green tea: may help prevent cancer, promotes weight loss, speeds up muscle recovery in athletes, high in disease-fighting chatechins (a group of antioxidants), boosts energy, aids in reducing damage from UVB radiation
  • Hibiscus flower: tart, very high in Vitamin C and antioxidants, lowers blood pressure, supports healthy cholesterol and triglycerides, natural antidepressant
  • Ginger: soothes the stomach, enhances immunity, protects brain health, eases pain, increases weight loss, promotes blood sugar control
  • Echinacea: eases pain, functions as a laxative to help loosen the bowels, anti-inflammatory (especially helpful for rheumatoid arthritis), relieves upper respiratory issues, immune-boosting (helps relieve the flu, asthma, common cold, croup, strep throat, whooping cough), fights infection
  • Yerba mate: promotes energy, mental alertness, fights cancer and inflammatory diseases, high antioxidant count, anti-inflammatory, stimulates the immune system, kills colon cancer cells, contains a host of beneficial vitamins, minerals and other health-promoting compounds, reduces cholesterol levels, promotes weight loss
  • Linden: potent sedative, calming, relieves high blood pressure, soothes digestion

The Tug of Egypt

TheTugOfEgypt

As I read through Exodus, Numbers, and Leviticus in my daily devotions, I am again drawn to the lessons God has for us in all the books of the Old Testament. I understand that:

  1. The Old Testament is God’s Story to show us our need for Him.
  2. The Old Testament shows us our sin state.
  3. Egypt is a picture of sin.
  4. Joseph is a prototype of Jesus.
  5. God wants to show us that, without His intervention, we could not, would not leave Egypt/sin.

Questions arise as I read:

  • If Joseph is a prototype of Jesus, why did God use Joseph to invite his family to Egypt? I don’t think Jesus invites us to sin.
  • After Jacob and all the Israelites moved to Egypt, life was good. But then a new Egyptian ruler came to power. The Egyptians slowly but surely put the Israelites under subjection and forced them into slavery. Why didn’t the Israelites escape while they could, and go back to their homeland? Why didn’t even a few families decide that they should return to Canaan instead of staying in Egypt?
  • After Moses led the Israelites out of Egypt, and all the Israelites witnessed with their own eyes the power and magnitude of God, why, when any little problem popped up, did they cry to return to Egypt?
  • What is God’s lesson to me when the spies went into the Promised Land? Only two of the spies (Joshua and Caleb) gave a favorable report and encouraged them to go because God would be with them. And all the people sided with the scared reports; they spoke of selecting a captain to lead them back to Egypt (Numbers 14.4).

As I prayed and continued reading, God brought these lessons to me:

Jesus doesn’t invite us to live in sin. He goes before us, to prepare the land so that we may live there in God’s grace. God knows we choose sin (Genesis 6.5), and that we will be enticed into more sin, and that we will want to stay there. As Joseph was placed in Egypt to prepare for the Israelites to live there, Jesus came to Earth to live in our sin with us, to show us how to live and give us hope; and, ultimately, to show us that there is a way out if we obey Him.

The Israelites did not escape from Egypt while they could. It is the same with us and sin. We are enticed to live in sin. It looks good. Satan disguises himself as an angel of light. Life was good in Egypt. Jacob and his sons, the first generation of Israelites who lived in Egypt, established a home there. They had children who grew up there and had children and grandchildren of their own. They considered Egypt their homeland. The new pharaoh began putting stiffer and stiffer burdens on them. Still they did not leave.

Look at the Jewish people in Germany and surrounding countries in the 1930’s and ‘40’s. They did not try to escape their homes, even after they were required to wear the Star of David. They couldn’t imagine the evil to come until it was too late.

Look at the Jews exiled in Babylon. Even after they were allowed to return to their homeland, many stayed in Babylon.

Look at America. We live in a sinful culture. We are sucked into it: television shows we shouldn’t watch; products we shouldn’t buy but we do because we’re enticed by the ads and we believe they’ll make our lives better somehow; clothing we wear or allow our children to wear; jobs we take; music we listen to; movies we watch; ministries we assume without consulting God; friends with whom we associate and how we associate with them; Internet sites we visit, and amount of time online, both of which detract from our walk with God; words we use or continue to listen to that do not glorify God. These are every day sins we don’t even think about because they are an integral part of our lives, and EVERYBODY DOES IT. We are using our families and friends and neighbors and media as our plumb line, instead of God.

Is there any escaping this? To where do we flee? We haven’t a “homeland” as the Israelites did, no physical Promised Land flowing with milk and honey. My heritage is Irish and Czech, among others; am I supposed to try to go back to one of those countries, to live with “my people?” I was born an American, and this is my home. Just like the children of Israel: they were born in Egypt, their families were born in Egypt, and that was their home. They became slaves to Egypt / slaves to sin in a subtle way, and then there they were, crying to God to save them. [I think, in America, many of us have not yet come to the point to realize that we must cry out to God to save us. We have it too good, and we don’t want to be saved.] [We, as Christians, do have a homeland, by the way: it is the Person of Jesus Christ, and God’s Holy Spirit dwelling within us. We get to carry our homeland with us all the time, and go to it for all eternity.]

God allowed the children of Israel, living in Egypt, to come to the point of crying out to Him. He needed them to understand their need for Him, to know that they could not save themselves; but to know that they needed to be saved. [God still works the same way. He brings each of us to the point where we know we must cry out to Him, know He is the only One Who can save us because we are slaves to sin and cannot save ourselves.]

After God displayed His glory to Egypt and the Israelites, after He saved His people from bondage, after His people witnessed miracle after miracle, proving that God loved them and had in mind a beautiful life for them; after all that, when the Israelites faced hardships and seemingly insurmountable odds, they cried to return to Egypt. (Exodus 14.11 And they said unto Moses, Because there were no graves in Egypt, hast thou taken us away to die in the wilderness? wherefore hast thou dealt thus with us, to carry us forth out of Egypt? Numbers 14.1-3 And all the congregation lifted up their voice, and cried; and the people wept that night. And all the children of Israel murmured against Moses and against Aaron: and the whole congregation said unto them, Would God that we had died in the land of Egypt! or would God we had died in this wilderness! And wherefore hath the LORD brought us unto this land, to fall by the sword, that our wives and our children should be a prey? were it not better for us to return into Egypt?)

In our own lives, we easily forget the power of God that saved us, and that same power that is still available to us. The lure of sin is strong. Sin is our comfort zone; it’s where we lived for a long time, and we had conditioned ourselves to arrange our lives around it and make do. This new life of blind obedience to God, depending on Him for our daily need is too scary. We can’t see what it will look like, so we go back to what we knew before. The Israelites could not see into a future with God, could not imagine His glory in their lives on a day-to-day basis.

As modern Christians, we are fortunate to have God’s Word at our fingertips. We are infinitely blessed to have God’s very Holy Spirit living within us! Even with what God has given us, it is a hard thing to live in day-to-day obedience to God and depend on His mercy and grace. It takes strength to step out in faith all the time, and to depend on God to provide whatever we are going to need. We can empathize with the Israelites in their desires to go back to what they knew.

[Sometimes it’s not we, ourselves, who are struggling with sin and the desire to return to it. Sometimes it’s a loved one. We can see it in someone else’s life. We must have compassion on those who struggle with sin. It is a strong force. Thanks be to God, He is stronger; but we must have patience, and pray for those who struggle.]

When the Israelites had finally reached their promised destination, when they were on the verge of entering into the Promised Land, when they had traveled in the wilderness for months, when they had lived day-by-day upon God’s provision of water and manna and protection, when they saw the gorgeous fruit of the land they could have; they gave up. The spies came back with a scary report, and everyone believed that the giants living there would swallow them up. They really thought that all this was for nothing, and they wanted to return to Egypt.

REALLY??? Well, yeah. It’s hard to believe that sin has such a strong a pull on us. Hard to believe unless you’re in the throes of temptation, yourself (or love someone who is). Whether it’s finances or sex or power or tobacco or alcohol or drugs or language or anger or fear or bitterness or food; we hear that siren call of sin – the one that’s personal to us. We’re ready to give up all the promises God gives us for the future, in order to have that one little taste again of the past.

If we want sin, God allows us to follow it.

FALL ON YOUR FACE BEFORE GOD, just as Moses and Aaron did so many times. Beg for mercy, beg for grace and forgiveness and strength and guidance. When faced with temptation, turn around and face God. Embrace Him instead of the sin. Ask Him. He’s there. He longs to jump in to save you from whatever it is.

But we must obey God.

Remember: God created the universe, and He created you. We live by His rules. [Also remember, His rules are for our good, and because He loves us.]

God is holy. He will not compromise; but He will forgive.

Read, ingest, swallow and digest God’s Word. He gives it to us for our good, because He loves us so much.

Read what God has to say. Learn His ways. Obey Him. God always blesses obedience.

More Magnesium

Dr Josh Axe has a great article about our need of, and depletion of, magnesium. I have written about magnesium before, here.  Besides a good diet and finding good supplements, other sources of magnesium are: Epsom salts bath, stinging nettle tea, and magnesium oil (featured in the post I just referenced).

Dr Axe’s full article is found here: https://draxe.com/nutrition/9-signs-magnesium-deficiency/

Some exerpts:

“Magnesium is arguably the most important mineral in the body, which is why magnesium deficiency can be such an issue.

“According to Norman Shealy, MD, Ph.D, an American neurosurgeon and a pioneer in pain medicine, “Every known illness is associated with a magnesium deficiency and it’s the missing cure to many diseases.” Not only does magnesium help regulate calcium, potassium and sodium, but it’s essential for cellular health and a critical component of over 300 biochemical functions in the body.

“Even glutathione, your body’s most powerful antioxidant that has even been called “the master antioxidant,” requires magnesium for its synthesis. Unfortunately, most people are not aware of this, and millions suffer daily from magnesium deficiency without even knowing it.”

Key symptoms of magnesium deficiency: leg cramps, insomnia, muscle pain / fibromyalgia, anxiety, high blood pressure, type II diabetes, fatigue, migraines, and osteoporosis.

Again, please visit Dr Axe’s site to read more: https://draxe.com/nutrition/9-signs-magnesium-deficiency/

Morning Musing

MorningMusing

One of my daily joys is watching the sunrise. I get to do my reading by a big picture window, and we get a pretty good view of the sunrise.

This morning, though, I am in a hurry. We have things to do, and I needed to leave my front-row seat and get busy. As I finished my hot drink, and prepared to get moving, the sun was not really up yet. The beginnings of color were there, but I wanted to sit a while longer and see the brilliant colors.

I wished I could put the sunrise on fast forward, watch it, then rewind so that it could happen in real time; and I could get on with my busy schedule.

But things don’t happen that way. God didn’t design things that way.

Marketers understand that people want to do things their own way, on their own schedules, so they cater to that mindset. It’s becoming increasingly important that we get to do things the way we want.

God doesn’t work that way, and it’s a good thing.

God has His own timing, and He’s in control. We are not in control.

Let’s think about slowing down, paying attention to the way God designed things, and conforming our schedules to His.

“Lady Parts” Webinar

There is another health webinar coming up, having to do with “lady parts.” The link to sign up is provided at the end of this post. The dates are Feb 6th and 7th. The following information is written by Isa Herrera, and is taken from this website (please visit it to find out more):

https://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/what-pelvic-floor-why-should-we-be-talking-about-it?

LadyPartsWebinar

Isa Herrera, MSPT, CSCS is a New York City-based holistic women’s pelvic floor specialist, author of 5 books on pelvic health, including the 2017 international best seller Female Pelvic Alchemy and the ground-breaking self-help book, Ending Female Pain, A Woman’s Manual. She has dedicated her career to advancing awareness of pelvic floor conditions so that more women can find relief from this silent epidemic that affects over 30 million women in the US alone. Ms. Herrera holds a BA in Psychology and Biology from Fordham University and also a Masters in Physical Therapy from Hunter College. For more info, go to https://www.PelvicPainRelief.com

Over 30 million women have pelvic floor problems like urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and pain during intercourse. If you’re among them, you’re not alone. Here’s what you can do to find relief

Maybe you’ve heard the term “pelvic floor” and thought it was a bit confusing. Or maybe you’re very familiar with the term because you’re struggling with incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, or pain and discomfort during sex.

If this is you, chances are good you’ve likely been offered very little in the way of information or options. Most docs aren’t exactly well versed in this area of expertise, and many encourage women to resort to painful surgeries and injections — which is why I’m bringing you an in-depth look at the pelvic floor today.

We’re going to explore exactly what this term means, what it looks like when issues start to arise and steps you can take to heal yourself. I’ve helped 15,000 women worldwide regain their pelvic health. You can believe that after treating that many women, I’ve seen it all.

You are not alone! Over 30 million women in the U.S. have experienced pelvic floor problems. I promise that your issues with your pelvic floor are treatable and you can heal. Just don’t give up.

My hope is that after reading this, you’ll be inspired to heal yourself and share what I’m teaching here with other women, too.

What Is the Pelvic Floor?

The pelvic floor is the core of the female body. It is a group of muscles and tissue that support all of the organs in the pelvis, including the vagina, uterus, bowel\ and bladder. These muscles control urinary function, bowel movements and orgasms.

Let’s just say they’re an extremely important part of the female anatomy.

A full one-quarter of women have experienced episodes of involuntary leaking of urine. Over 50% of the women in the U.S. experience a degree of pelvic organ prolapse and 12% will have surgery for it.

And those are just the ones who have reported symptoms. Many of our sisters suffer in silence, too ashamed to tell anyone about their experiences.

Often, when they bring their concerns up to a doctor, they’re dismissed as simply “part of the aging process” or “what happens to everyone after childbirth.”

It breaks my heart. And I want every woman to know that they have other options —  options that involve non-invasive techniques and options that leave you feeling empowered and not victimized. In my practice, I help women every day to learn:

  • Yoga moves
  • Abdominal exercises
  • Pelvic massage techniques
  • Kegels — did you know there are over 13 types of these exercises?
  • Sound healing meditations
  • Breathwork

These techniques help you to take control of your pelvic floor and heal incontinence and prolapse — no knives, pills or needles required.

Sign up for my complimentary masterclass “5 Steps to Happier ‘Lady Parts’: Stop Leaking, Heal Prolapse, and Relieve Pain without Setting Foot in the Doctor’s Office.”

Discover tips and tools you won’t find anywhere else that will help you to feel whole again and in control of your pelvic, sexual and bladder health. It’s simply your birthright to understand your divine female anatomy. And it’s time you claimed it.

This is the same information that I’ve used to improve the lives of almost 15,000 women across the globe. It’s the information that you need to go from confused and suffering to vibrant and pain-free and symptom free.

Before you consider having surgery or injections — please check out this free resource and tell your friends to do the same. I want every woman to have access to this life-changing information.

https://isa.pelvicpainrelief.com/fpa-2020-sj-masterclass35674352?a=1048&ip=73.8.235.72&o=3&t=102ce4545235fee24cf7522487fa1e