Get-To-Know-Me-Tag

get to know me tag

Thank you Amy Blount at A New Life (https://anewlife256599767.wordpress.com/ )  Head over to her site for some amazing reading.

Questions:

What does your name mean?  Kathy – chaste, pure

Are you scared of heights? Not so much. When I’ve been at the edge of a precipice with no guardrail, I feel like I’m going to jump or fall off, but I haven’t yet.

What is your best physical feature?  Ummm… People tell me it’s my smile.

What is your favorite music genre?  I love the old hymns. I also like bluegrass. When they’re put together it’s cool.

Are you a good cook?  I like to eat what I cook, and so do the eaters.

What’s your favorite ice cream flavor?  Ha. When I read this, I was eating a Zesto Collider with peanut butter cups mixed into chocolate ice cream. ~sigh~   Or one of the new DQ blizzards: Jurrasic Chomp (specify, “in chocolate ice cream”).

What’s your favorite festival?   The most amazing one I’ve attended was the balloon festival in Albuquerque, NM.

Do you have any allergies?  Lots and lots. I didn’t know about them until I was tested a few years back. Ignorance wasn’t exactly bliss, but it was depressing to find out I was allergic to everything I ate and lived in. Things are better now.

Which of your parents do you look like?  Daddy, with many shades of Mama.

Who is your favorite musician?  I am woefully behind on current music. I liked Steve Green, Don Francisco, and the Archies. I’ve been leading Sing Along at Assisted Living, and I’m gettin’ into Doris Day, Andy Williams, Tennessee Ernie Ford, and Bing Crosby.

Who is or was the most influential person in your life?  Besides Jesus, my husband, but I didn’t meet him until I was almost 50.

What is your favorite time of the year?  I do love the seasons! All of them. I’m grateful that God gave us changes of new life, rest, rejuvenation, hunkering down, and swimming.

My extra question/s for my nominees:

How much time do you spend on your e-device/s?

 

I’m taking my cue on nominations from others’ posts: I nominate anyone reading this who would like to participate! I really appreciate and enjoy everybody reading each other’s blogs, and look forward to reading more about you.

Rules:

  1. Thank the Person Who Nominated You
  2. Provide a Link to their Website
  3. Answer the “Get To Know Me” Questions
  4. Nominate 10-15 Bloggers.

Pass on the Same 10 Questions (with an additional of 2 of yours, if you wish) Note: the additional 2’s are adding up, so answer and ask whatever you like.

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God’s Green Goodness

weeding

I was weeding the yard with my husband the other day (yeah, we have romantic moments like that). He is more into weeding than I am. When he works alone, he likes mindless labor, during which he can mull over and solve the world’s problems. When I join him, we can chat or work together in silence as we each do our own mulling.

As I worked in the yard, I was thinking about the “weeds” we were pulling up. First of all, do we really need to do this? Aren’t some of these actually medicinal plants? like the plantain and the dandelion and the mullein – I’ve taken some herbal remedy courses, and I know these have healing properties. However, a road runs along our yard, and I hesitate to use any of these plants that have had exhaust spat on them.

Although some of the weeds grow in the middle parts of our yard, most of them grow along the edge, at the road. We call them “road warrior plants” because they grow in the fiercest conditions: car/truck/diesel exhaust, snow plow dumping grounds, doggie deposits. They create a type of barrier, I think, for the rest of the lawn, guarding the tender grass and taking the brunt of the dirtier side of floriculture life.

As we pulled, my husband talked about animals (he’s into watching wildlife, discerning their habits and learning from them). “Look at the deer and cattle when they eat in the fields,” he said. “They don’t pull their food straight up. They pull sideways. I figured there was a reason they did that, so I started pulling weeds sideways, and by golly, they come up easier, and more of the root comes with it!” So I started pulling sideways. (Yup, he’s right.)

While God says, in His Word, that He provides plants for our healing, He also discusses weeds (or “tares”) that must be pulled out and burned. God was mighty particular about how He created our world. He had reasons for every bit of it.

God told Adam, when he was cast out of the garden, that he would have to work to till for his food. Those pesky weeds would be a thorn in his side, and the sides of all who came after him as they struggled to grow food in the fields. The plowed and planted fields that were made for people food had weeds that must be got rid of and burned: that’s like God growing His people and we keep sinning, and we have to weed out and put to death the sin among us. And, how God will ultimately weed out between His Chosen unto salvation, and those who are condemned to the pit of hell (Matthew 13.40 As therefore the tares are gathered and burned in the fire; so shall it be in the end of this world.).

But sheep and cattle and other livestock: those are the animals God wants us to take care of, and it’s important for the tender to carefully select the fields where they eat. (Side Note: If you’ve not read A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, by Phillip Keller, please do.) But the tender does not have to till the field or pull the weeds – the animals eat those. God provides.

John 10.9 I am the door: by me if any man enter in, he shall be saved, and shall go in and out, and find pasture.

Talk about random thoughts (my Maggie Tiggles tagline)! Anyway, there’s something for you to chew on. If you pull sideways, you’ll get more nutrition.

What We do with Memories

Funny how fragments spill into the mind sometimes. I reached down to scoop up a crumpled paper that had missed the trash basket, and my eye caught the edge of a printed picture. I was immediately transported back to when my son was a small boy.

We had recently returned from a summer trip to the southwest. We’d spent the Fourth of July with my Uncle Bernie in New Mexico, who was always ammo-stocked for a blammo water gun fight. From there we journeyed to the Grand Canyon. Before we left, we’d made the study of the formation of the Grand Canyon one of our homeschooling projects. As we stood at the railing looking out in awe of God’s majestic handiwork, we discussed the science of how God had formed it, and the similarities to the canyons formed after the eruption of Mt St Helen’s and subsequent earthquake and mudflows.

The memory was of a phone call after supper, back at home. My parents called, wondering how our trip went. First Jonathan had to tell them that we’d had spaghetti for supper because that was his favorite. As he talked, he climbed up to kneel on the table so he could look out the big window. Then he asked my mom if she’d ever been to the Grand Canyon. Yes, she said, a long time ago when she was a little girl. “Oh, Grandma!” Jonathan exclaimed. “You should go see it again. It’s changed a lot since then. It’s really pretty!”

I got my camera and took a picture of Jonathan, perched on the supper table and talking with his grandparents. I still have it.

Does time distort our perception of reality, or clarify it? I know, as a busy single mother I was too often too short with my son, and too focused on handling the disappointments of daily life. I did not cherish the moments or the fascination of watching my son grow into the amazing man he is now. But I am grateful for the memories nonetheless, and how they are presently seated in my mind

A Humble Heart

James 4.10: Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and he shall lift you up.

In 2 Kings 5, a man named Naaman, “captain of the host of the king of Syria,” had leprosy. Even while struggling with this health (and social) issue, he was a mighty servant of his king. When Naaman heard about a prophet in Israel who could cure him, he asked permission of his king to go and be healed. His king obviously regarded him highly, as he told him to go to, and sent with him silver, gold, and fine raiment with which to pay.

When Naaman found the prophet, he had high expectations. Naaman, even with a humbling health issue, thought himself worthy of great honor. He figured the great prophet would come out and call down power from his god above, and Naaman would be miraculously and stupendously healed – and he would have a great story to spread abroad about how important he was.

1 Samuel 16.7 …  for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the LORD looketh on the heart.

Lord looks on the heart

But God knows the heart of man, and He knew the heart of this man, Naaman.

Instead Elisha, the prophet, sent his servant to deliver the instructions to Naaman: “Go and wash in Jordan seven times, and thy flesh shall come again to thee, and thou shalt be clean.”

Naaman was quite put out. He wanted nothing to do with a puny servant, he was important enough that the great prophet himself should come to him, he had brought awesome gifts to give for his healing, and that old Jordan was icky, anyway.

God must have given Naaman’s servant an inkling of the potential meekness in his master’s heart, for he begged of Naaman to reconsider. Surely Naaman would have done some mighty act of courage to clear his leprosy; he might as well do this simple thing.

Even if Naaman went into the Jordan with a stiff neck, God blessed him. God not only cleansed him from his leprosy, He also scoured out his pride. Naaman returned to Elisha’s house a changed man. He humbled himself. He acknowledged the Lord God as God of all the earth, he vowed to serve only the Lord God, and begged pardon for instances when he would have to bow with his master in the house of Rimmon.

God does not ask hard things of us. He asks obedience, and He blesses abundantly. Humble yourself, therefore, under the mighty hand of God, and see what He does.

Waters

water W imageaters, born from above

gurgle and babble, stumble and tumble.

Bubbling, dodging, splashing against        

obstacles in the way, as a springboard,

                      running between deep and shallow,

                      flowing like sinews and muscle

                      then

                      leveling, slowing,

                      sliding into silken pools

                      gliding sedately in their paths,

                      nodding and yielding to immoveable rocks.

                      Deep underneath

                      tribulation, distress, leaps and joys tangle,

                      rising to the surface as lines of grey,

                      and forming ripples and swirls

                      like wrinkles

                      as time suddenly catches up.

                      It straddles the precipice, clinging to moments

                      before its swooping descent, splashing

                      in streaks of wild white strands

                      plunging with reckless abandon

to its end

                     b

         e

  l

                                                                   o

water W imageaters born from above

                                                      gurgle and babble stumble and tumble.

                                                      Bubbling, dodging, splashing against

                                                      obstacles in the way, as a springboard,

Maureen’s Bad Day

Maureens bad day Fall 2012

While I am immensely glad to be retired, and I very much enjoy staying at home, I will say there were many perks in my special ed teaching job. Those almost always had to do with my students. I had a great bunch, overall. At the high school level, I received new students at the age of 13 or 14; because we were a self-contained classroom, I kept them all day, every day, until they turned 21. I got to know them and their parents pretty well.

One student in particular became close to my heart. That was Maureen. Maureen and I simply liked each other. We were kindred spirits. Her dad was the ROTC teacher at my school. Maureen had really cool parents – both of them, and a really cool family.

Each morning in our classroom the students would come in from the buses and hang up their stuff in their individual cubbies. This area was a new addition, and I had designed it so that each student had a coat hook, and a small area above the hook to put their books or other belongings. The students had supervised free time before the bell rang.

Promptly at 8 a.m. the bell rang, and everyone was herded over to sit at the tables in the calendar area. Everyone was expected to participate in calendar, when we went over what day is today, what happened yesterday, what today’s schedule would look like, counting, colors, patterns, etc.

One morning I had started on calendar, and I noticed that my aide, Gloria, was looking a little harassed. She came over to the other side of the bookcase between the calendar area and the coat area and flagged my attention. I went over, and she explained that she couldn’t get Maureen away from her cubby. I gave an inquiring look, and Gloria simply pointed. I peeked around the bookcase and beheld Maureen, la plus pathétique.

I don’t know if it was the parent in me, or the teacher, but I immediately and silently started to laugh. Not one to let a good situation slip away, I grabbed the camera and took the shot.

Gloria explained that a bus driver had told her that one of the other kids on the bus had screamed all the way to school, and Maureen hadn’t taken it well. Mind you, school bus rides are often longer than an hour. I had Gloria take over the calendar while I ministered to Maureen.

I went over and gave Maureen a hug. It didn’t seem to help much. I asked her if she needed a hug from her dad. She looked hopefully at me. I took Maureen to my office area within the classroom, and talked to her about the picture I had just taken of her. Together, we decided on some words to go with it, and I printed out the picture with the caption: “Dear Dad. I’m having a no-good, very bad day, and I need a hug.”

I gave the picture to Maureen, and together we walked down a few hallways to her dad’s classroom. He came to the door when he saw us, and we explained what had happened. Maureen got her hug, Dad kept the picture, and the rest of Maureen’s day was much better.

I e-mailed that picture to a fellow teacher who knows Maureen. She got quite a kick out of it. She printed the picture to put by her desk; her caption was, “Some days are just like that!”

Liebster Award

Liebster Award other pic

Liebster Award!! Well this looks fun.

Thank you to Stu for nominating me – Stu, you’re so cool.

Here are my answers to Stu’s questions:

  1. Besides the Bible what is your favorite book you have ever read?

Oh, oh, oh. So many favorites, it’s hard to pick one. The Secret Garden (Frances Hodgson Burnett) was a favorite for years and years. I still love it.  The Wild Swans (Hans Christian Andersen) took my heart at an early age. A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23 (Phillip Keller) – wow. Another wow: The Shack (William P. Young).

  1. What, in your opinion, is your greatest achievement in life?

I’m pretty mundane. I love and respect my parents. People who know me know I love Jesus and that He’s my Savior.

  1. What is your reason for blogging?

I wrote a book: Book I, In Which We Meet Maggie Tiggles. That’s where the blog name came from. If I ever do anything with the book, I wanted to make sure I got the blog name before anyone else thought of it. I like to write, and my stuff was gathering virtual dust on my laptop. God gives me some great devotions sometimes, and that’s mostly what I write. The blogging presence I’ve encountered has taken my breath away – so encouraging and uplifting! I feel like I’m having devotions when I read all those blogs.

  1. What is the best advice you have for newer bloggers?

I am a newer blogger; I still don’t know what I’m doing!

  1. If you could change anything in the world, what would it be?

I would make it clean again. I despair and grieve over the pollution in our air, water, land, and food, and the fact that we are poisoning ourselves with chemicals.

  1. Do you color with crayons or markers?

Oh, crayons, absolutely. I’m messy, and crayons are more forgiving.

  1. Besides Jesus, who is your favorite biblical figure?

I don’t know that I have a favorite character, but one of my favorite moments is when Hezekiah, confronted by fierce-looking Assyrians, and receiving a letter from Sennacherib, goes to the house of the Lord and humbly spreads the letter before his Lord.

  1. Who or what makes you yearn to be a better person than you were yesterday?

The Holy Spirit. Each day He teaches me something new, and I yearn more and more to be like Him.

  1. When you go out on the town, what is your attire?

The closest I get to “out on the town” is our small-town, once-a-month summertime downtown block party. Comfy is key. I do like to dress to the nines once in a great while, and it’s usually some kind of to-do with my mother.

  1. If you have children, where is your favorite place to take them?

My son is 35. When he was little, one of our favorite things to do was go out to dinner. He was always so well-behaved, and he really enjoyed it. We still do.

Ten Random Facts About Me:

  1. My husband asked how he can vote for me for the Leibster Award.
  2. I was 52 when I married, he was 53; first marriage for both of us. We’re coming up on ten whole years!!
  3. I was a single mother for 27 years.
  4. I am an Air Force brat. I graduated high school in Wiesbaden, Germany. 40 years after graduation, in Rapid City, SD, I happened to meet Bruce, with whom I graduated.
  5. It tickles me to no end that the word “stuff” is in the Bible. Several times.
  6. I dislike cleaning house.
  7. I enjoy cooking and baking.
  8. I belong to a Facebook group: Topical Steroid Withdrawal – Red Skin Syndrome. We are people from all over the world who suffer from steroid addiction/sensitivity and who are withdrawing from all steroids. It is a rough process. The stories and pictures that I see break my heart, especially the little ones. If you are interested, please visit https://itsan.org/ .
  9. I don’t think I like television as much as most people.
  10. Ever since I was a little girl, I’ve written my own scripts and choreographed my own dances for movies, all in my head.

All nominations are voluntary and if the blogger chooses to accept the nomination, please read the full rules here.  (It’s a good idea to go there and read about this.) https://theglobalaussie.com/liebster-award-2018/

The short-list of rules is:

Thank the person who nominated you and provide a link to their blog.

Answer the questions you were asked.

Share 10 random facts about yourself.

Nominate at least 3 blogs for the award.

Make up 10 questions for your nominees and inform them of the nomination.

 

I nominate these for the Leibster award:

Maria Tatham https://pilgrimsprogressrevisted.com/

Greg Holt  https://inspirationalchristiansfortoday.com/author/writinggomer/

Cheryl Zelenka  https://inspirationalchristiansfortoday.com/author/cherylz1961/

Crystal Gaudet  https://blogsbychristianwomen.com/author/crystal-gaudet/

Danielle Marcantel https://girly-christian.com/author/girlychristian/

Lois Robinson  https://loftforum.wordpress.com/author/loftspeaker1/

https://heavensreef.wordpress.com/

Cindy Dawson  https://realchristianwomen.blog/

 

Here are your ten questions:

  1. What makes you gasp in awe/delight?
  2. What weather makes you sparkle? Are you out in it, or watching?
  3. You know how a smell can trigger a memory and instantly transport you? Describe a vivid experience.
  4. Do you have a favorite idiom/saying/quip you use or have heard? Explain.
  5. What does the word, “speed” conjure up for you?
  6. Describe the tastes and textures of a favorite meal.
  7. Have you had one of those moments where the presence of God was strong? Describe.
  8. You are at a large picnic in a meadow; a barn and a small creek are nearby. The tables are spread with gingham cloths, and full of scrumptious, homemade food. Who is with you?
  9. City lights or down-home country?
  10. What was the best way you ever spent money?